Quiet on the “mandate” front

August 31, 2009 at 2:27 pm | Posted in Bush, Obama!, politics straight up | Leave a comment
Tags:

Vase disguise awarded prize at colorful ball in Capitol. Washington D.C. A prize well deserved was awarded to A. Richard Hill who attended Washingtons colorful Bal Boheme Ball last night representing a Louis XIV vase. Receiving honorable mention for the most original costume Hill is shown being introduced by Rep. Sol Bloom of New York.  1937 February 2.  (Library of Congress)

Vase disguise awarded prize at colorful ball in Capitol. Washington D.C. A prize well deserved was awarded to A. Richard Hill who attended Washington's colorful Bal Boheme Ball last night representing a Louis XIV vase. Receiving honorable mention for the most original costume Hill is shown being introduced by Rep. Sol Bloom of New York. 1937 February 2. (Library of Congress)

It’s interesting how the public was repeatedly told that George Bush had a mandate to govern as he saw fit, despite losing the popular vote in 2000 and barely scraping by in the 2004 election, but there is an adamant refusal to acknowledge any mandate conveyed by the American people to Barack Obama in last November’s vote.

Advertisements

Megan McArdle: Murder Apologist & Advocate

June 1, 2009 at 6:25 pm | Posted in Bush, God machine, law, terrorism | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , ,

Sand destroying once fertile land. Maine.  Published 1936 May.  Paul Carter, photographer

Sand destroying once fertile land. Maine. Published 1936 May. Paul Carter, photographer

This is absolutely the most disgusting thing I have ever read. That her friends and family don’t shrink back from her in horror brings shame on them.

Megan McArdle spends the first few paragraphs of her response to Ezra Klein explaining how she’s pro-choice. I guess that’s an attempt to give her argument a patina of reasonableness. Her mind-blowing argument is that we should not impinge the terrorists’ ability to terrorize us:

We accept that when the law is powerless, people are entitled to kill in order to prevent other murders–had Tiller whipped out a gun at an elementary school, we would now be applauding his murderer’s actions. In this case, the law was powerless because the law supported late-term abortions. Moreover, that law had been ruled outside the normal political process by the Supreme Court. If you think that someone is committing hundreds of gruesome murders a year, and that the law cannot touch him, what is the moral action? To shrug? Is that what you think of ordinary Germans who ignored Nazi crimes? Is it really much of an excuse to say that, well, most of your neighbors didn’t seem to mind, so you concluded it must be all right? We are not morally required to obey an unjust law. In fact, when the death of innocents is involved, we are required to defy it.

This is what eight years of the lying, skeevy Bush/Cheney cabal has wrought. We now live in a country where torture goes unpunished and murder is not only justified but described as a reasonable response to “an unjust law.”

How is this not a nightmare?

How is this not deeply twisted and anathema to everything this country is supposed to represent?

The mind reels.

UPDATE: Apparently McArdle is channeling Francis Schaeffer, a 1980s advocate of using terrorism to achieve the goal of making abortion illegal.

Am I missing something?

May 18, 2009 at 2:03 pm | Posted in Bush, torture | Leave a comment
Tags: , ,
Print shows a mob pouring tea into the mouth of a Loyalist who has been tarred and feathered. Behind the group, on the right, is the Liberty Tree from which hangs a noose and a sign Stamp Act written upside down; on the left, revolutionaries on a ship pouring crates of tea into the water.  Copied on stone by D. C. Johnston from a print published in London 1774, published Boston : Pendleton, 1830

Print shows a mob pouring tea into the mouth of a Loyalist who has been tarred and feathered. Behind the group, on the right, is the "Liberty Tree" from which hangs a noose and a sign "Stamp Act" written upside down; on the left, revolutionaries on a ship pouring crates of tea into the water. Copied on stone by D. C. Johnston from a print published in London 1774, published Boston : Pendleton, 1830

Why has the last week of “news” been taken up with the burning question of what Nancy Pelosi knew about the Bush torture program?

Isn’t the real question, what did George W. Bush know about his torture program?

Federal Deficit Fueled By Bush Tax Cuts

May 10, 2009 at 10:53 am | Posted in Bush, Economy, politics straight up | Leave a comment
Tags: , , ,
The trillions spent on giveaways to the richest Americans needing them least dwarfed the expanded expenditures on defense and homeland security, entitlements like the Medicare prescription drug benefit or other discretionary spending.

"The trillions spent on giveaways to the richest Americans needing them least dwarfed the expanded expenditures on defense and homeland security, entitlements like the Medicare prescription drug benefit or other discretionary spending."

America’s Opportunity

April 25, 2009 at 9:22 am | Posted in Bush, torture | Leave a comment
Tags: , , ,
Naked young women being brutally tortured by Spanish Inquisition.  Photogravure after Jose Brito, copyrighted by G. Barrie & Son, c. 1901.

Naked young women being brutally tortured by Spanish Inquisition. Photogravure after Jose Brito, copyrighted by G. Barrie & Son, c. 1901.

As things currently stand, there will be no investigation or prosecution of crimes committed by the United States Government over the past eight years. That there are any Americans who do not consider this outrageous is hard for me to understand.

Paul Krugman had an editorial in Thursday’s New York Times which you should read but I append here Mr. Krugman’s addendum from his blog:

One addendum to today’s column: the truth, which I think everyone in the political/media establishments knows in their hearts, is that the nine months or so between the summer of 2002 and the beginning of the Iraq insurgency were a great national moral test — a test that most people in influential positions failed.

The Bush administration was obviously — yes, obviously — telling tall tales in order to promote the war it wanted: the constant insinuations of an Iraq-9/11 link, the hyping of discredited claims about a nuclear program, etc.. And the question was, should you stand up against that? Not many did — and those who did were treated as if they were crazy.

For me and many others that was a radicalizing experience; I’ll never trust “sensible” opinion again. But for those who stayed “sensible” through the test, it’s a moment they’d like to see forgotten. That, I believe, is the real reason so many want to let torture and everything else go down the memory hole.

Let’s hope that doesn’t happen.

People who spoke against the use of torture, when not “treated as if they were crazy,” were ignored and their statements suppressed and destroyed.

If America does not investigate and prosecute war crimes committed by its own government, the terrorists will have indeed won and there will be nothing left of a once great dream that we are a people of laws and high moral ideals.

Five hundred years later people have not forgotten the Spanish Inquisition. Do Americans want this as their legacy?

Torture Is Not That Hard To Recognize.

April 24, 2009 at 9:42 am | Posted in Bush, torture | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , ,

Vodpod videos no longer available.

more about "Media Matters – Lawrence O’Donnell, J…", posted with vodpod

Torture is a criminal act.

April 23, 2009 at 11:18 pm | Posted in Bush, torture | 2 Comments
Tags: , , ,

If you’re not willing or able to read the Bush torture memos, at least listen to this song. YOUR GOVERNMENT engaged in this behavior. Your tax money paid the salaries of torturers, those who ordered the torture and those who “legalized” the torture, one of whom is currently a sitting Federal Judge.

If the Obama administration fails to investigate and prosecute these crimes, every member of the administration, including President Obama, will be as culpable as if they had participated directly and America will remain under a moral cloud.

Hopes Raised, Dashed.

April 13, 2009 at 11:23 pm | Posted in Bush, Department of Defense, Foreign Affairs, law, torture | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , ,
Justicia - Justice stands blindfolded as people around her are being tortured.  Pieter Bruegel (1525-1569), artist

"Justicia" - Justice stands blindfolded as people around her are being tortured. Pieter Bruegel (1525-1569), artist

Scott Horton at The Daily Beast:

Spanish prosecutors have decided to press forward with a criminal investigation targeting former U.S. Attorney General Alberto Gonzales and five top associates over their role in the torture of five Spanish citizens held at Guantánamo, several reliable sources close to the investigation have told The Daily Beast. Their decision is expected to be announced on Tuesday before the Spanish central criminal court, the Audencia Nacional, in Madrid.

[snip]

The six defendants—in addition to Gonzales, Federal Appeals Court Judge and former Assistant Attorney General Jay Bybee, University of California law professor and former Deputy Assistant Attorney General John Yoo, former Defense Department general counsel and current Chevron lawyer William J. Haynes II, Vice President Cheney’s former chief of staff David Addington, and former Undersecretary of Defense Douglas J. Feith—are accused of having given the green light to the torture and mistreatment of prisoners held in U.S. detention in “the war on terror.”

[snip]

The Bush Six labored at length to create a legal black hole in which they could implement their policies safe from the scrutiny of American courts and the American media. Perhaps they achieved much of their objective, but the law of unintended consequences has kicked in. If U.S. courts and prosecutors will not address the matter because of a lack of jurisdiction, foreign courts appear only too happy to step in.

I am having a hard time believing that anyone will prosecute the bastards, but the Spaniards give me hope.

It’s more than sad that an American should feel more hopeful at the effectiveness of a foreign legal system than their own.

h/t Hilzoy

UPDATE (4/16/09): It looks like my small hope has been dashed, at least for now.

An Octopus’s Garden

January 22, 2009 at 2:10 pm | Posted in Bush, CIA, Historical, music | Leave a comment
Tags: , , ,

(Russ Baker @ AlterNet) President Obama will face a staggering array of challenges, most, if not all, of which stem from the policies of Bush. But efforts at reform will fall short if we fail to probe and confront the powerful forces that wanted this disastrous administration in the White House in the first place — and that remain ready and able to maintain their influence behind the scenes today.

* * *

Over much of the last century, the Bushes have been serving the aims of a very narrow segment from within America’s wealthiest interests and families — typically through involvement in the most anti-New Deal investment banking circles, in the creation of a civilian intelligence service after World War II, and in some of that service’s most secretive and still-unacknowledged operations.

Through declassified documents and interviews, I unearthed evidence that George W. Bush’s father, the 41st president of the United States, had been working for the intelligence services no less than two decades before he was named CIA director in 1976. Time and again, Bush 41 and his allies have participated in clandestine operations to force presidents to do the bidding of oil and other resource-extraction interests, military contractors and financiers. Whenever a president showed independence or sought reforms that threatened entrenched interests, this group helped to ensure that he was politically attacked and neutralized, or even removed from office, through one means or another.

We are not dealing here with what are commonly dismissed as “conspiracy theories.” We are dealing with a reality that is much more subtle, layered and pervasive — a matrix of power in which crude conspiracies are rarely necessary and in which the execution or subsequent cover-up of anti-democratic acts become practically a norm.

Russ Baker is an award-winning investigative reporter. He has written for the New Yorker, Vanity Fair, The Nation, the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Village Voice and Esquire. Baker received a 2005 Deadline Club award for his exclusive reporting on George W. Bush’s military record. Information on his new book, Family of Secrets: the Bush Dynasty, the Powerful Forces That Put It in the White House, and What Their Influence Means for America, can be found here.

Lest We Forget.

January 19, 2009 at 5:12 pm | Posted in Bush, Historical, television | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , ,

Keith Olberman reviews eight years of Bush maladministration in eight minutes.

Watch it, lest you forget.

And read this, too.

The tumult and the shouting dies;
The captains and the kings depart:
Still stands Thine ancient sacrifice,
An humble and a contrite heart.
Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet,
Lest we forget – lest we forget!

Rudyard Kipling’s Recessional (June 22, 1897)

« Previous PageNext Page »

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.