The Great Depression & the New Deal

February 17, 2009 at 10:48 am | Posted in Economy, Historical | Leave a comment
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Migrant agricultural workers family. Seven hungry children. Mother aged thirty-two. Father is a native Californian. Destitute in pea pickers camp, Nipomo, California, because of the failure of the early pea crop. These people had just sold their tent in order to buy food. Of the twenty-five hundred people in this camp most of them were destitute.  February or March 1936.  (Photo: Dorothea Lange)

Migrant agricultural worker's family. Seven hungry children. Mother aged thirty-two. Father is a native Californian. Destitute in pea picker's camp, Nipomo, California, because of the failure of the early pea crop. These people had just sold their tent in order to buy food. Of the twenty-five hundred people in this camp most of them were destitute. February or March 1936. (Photo: Dorothea Lange)

It’s an hour — I know, I know, your time is precious, but so is your knowledge base.

Make some popcorn, get your comfy chair ready, then hop on over to C-Span and listen to Eric Rauchway, professor of history at UC-Davis, valued contributor to The Edge of the American West and author of several books, including “The Great Depression & the New Deal,” talk about what the Roosevelt administration did to save the United States in a time of national economic collapse.

Dental clinic, FSA (Farm Security Administration) camp, Weslaco, Texas, February 1942.  (Photo: Arthur Rothstein)

Dental clinic, FSA (Farm Security Administration) camp, Weslaco, Texas, February 1942. (Photo: Arthur Rothstein)

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